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Opening a Door to a Brighter Future

Stephanie Anderson, recipient of the Glady's Hoylman-King Scholarship

It has long been the belief at West Virginia University that success is bred through a solid foundation of education, dedication, and focus. But for so many students in the state, attending college remains a dream still out of grasp. The desire to pursue further study is a step in the right direction.

Students and families, particularly those living in rural and economically challenged areas, are stuck calculating the answer to the question, “how will we afford it?” Generous alumni of the Eberly College have opened their hearts—and their wallets—to ease that burden for these families.

Inspired by their own families and circumstances, they’re taking their turn to pass down the heirloom of opportunity. Stephanie Anderson grew up on a farm on the outskirts of Lewisburg, West Virginia.

“It was calm. I couldn’t wait to get out and be in a city, but now I miss it,” she said of the small town in Greenbrier County.

As a senior completing her bachelor’s degree in English with a minor in creative writing, though, Anderson said she knows she’s in the right place at the right time in her life. And it almost didn’t happen.

“My family didn’t have a lot of money to send me to college. Getting scholarships allows me to stay here and finish what I want to do,” she said. “You have student loans, but even that’s capped out. Without scholarships to pick up the rest I doubt I would be here.”

Even though determining how she was going to pay for college wasn’t always so clear, Anderson said there was never a question of whether pursuing further education was an option.

“I grew up with a dad who made sure I kept a 4.0 (GPA). When I came to college [my parents] loosened the reins, but the constant pushing me in high school made me want to do it on my own in college,” she said.

For the past two years she’s been the recipient of the Gladys Hoylman-King Scholarship, which is awarded to a Greenbrier County resident who is a WVU student enrolled in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences. Mary Ellen Mazey

The scholarship, she said, feels like a reward for the hard work she invests in school, but also is an investment in her and her future plans. Anderson wants to next pursue a master’s degree in English education.

“I still have this future that I’m running to. People who didn’t get to college are at their future now. l feel like college is a doorway into a brighter future.” “Being at college means everything right now. I’m so glad to be here,” she said. Anderson’s story is a familiar one to former Eberly College of Arts and Sciences dean Mary Ellen Mazey.

We all give money away each year. Investing in students is the best way to give back. It’s important for the future of America. A college education is essential to be successful in today’s world.

—Mary Ellen Mazey

Mazey, now the president at Bowling Green State University, and her brother Robert King established the Gladys Hoylman-King Scholarship to pay tribute to their mother, Gladys King, for her commitment to providing for their education.

When she was 30 years old, Gladys King’s husband died, and she was left raising three children alone while working in the kitchen of the Greenbrier Hotel.

“Mother would always tell us, ‘work hard and get an education and you’ll go far in life,’” Mazey said. “She was very optimistic. She always had a smile on her face. No matter how difficult the situation, she always looked at the best side of life.”

Mazey listened to her mother and worked her way through high school, ultimately being named the valedictorian of her class. For her efforts she was awarded a scholarship that was only available to high school valedictorians. “If it hadn’t been for the scholarship dollars, I wouldn’t have been able to go to college,” she said.

Humble beginnings mixed with hard work and the philanthropic spirit of others, Mazey said, can set the stage for academic success. “We were so poor we didn’t know we were poor—which was the best way to live,” she said of her Greenbrier County childhood.

Her brother Robert, now a federal judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals in Virginia, was the first of the family to attend college. He left to attend West Virginia University, where he earned his bachelor’s degree in political science and a law degree from the University.

Mazey later followed in his footsteps, earning a bachelor’s degree in sociology and a master’s degree in geology. She then continued her education at the University of Cincinnati, where she completed a doctoral program in urban geography.

“WVU is one of the greatest universities in the country. I had a great undergraduate experience there,” Mazey said. “My mother wouldn’t have thought of any other university.”

She went on to serve as dean of the Eberly College from 2005-2009, where she led the College as it developed a strategic plan, increased funding, created new academic programs, a strong advisory board, and established new facilities. It’s that experience and the scholarship she and her brother established years ago that she counts among her more treasured accomplishments.

“We hope everyone has the same opportunity we had,” Mazey said. “We all give money away each year. Investing in students is the best way to give back. It’s important for the future of America. A college education is essential to be successful in today’s world.”

The Gladys Hoylman-King Scholarship

The Gladys Hoylman-King Scholarship provides scholarships for Greenbrier County residents who are sophomores, juniors, or seniors enrolled at WVU in the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences demonstrating academic promise and financial need.

  • 2013-2014 – Stephanie Anderson
  • 2012-2013 – Stephanie Anderson
  • 2011-2012 – Emily Isaacs
  • 2010-2011 – Chelsea Richmond
  • 2009-2010 – Samantha Nickell
  • 2008-2009 – Chelsea Richmond
  • 2007-2008 – Bryan Crance
  • 2006-2007 – Arabeth Balasko
The Stanczak-Lamb Family Scholarship

The Stanczak-Lamb Family Scholarship is awarded annually to a sophomore, junior, or senior with financial need, majoring in an Arts and Sciences discipline and who has demonstrated academic achievement. Preference is given to students from Lewis County.

  • 2013-2014 – Jennifer Goslin
  • 2012-2013 – Jennifer Goslin
  • 2011-2012 – Tandra Sias
  • 2010-2011 – Tandra Sias
  • 2009-2010 – Noemi Borsay
  • 2008-2009 – Noemi Borsay and Emily Jones
  • 2007-2008 – Benjamin Deteman and Molly McCartney


While West Virginia resources provide financial assistance for students who can’t afford to attend college, a number of students, including those who would be categorized as “middle-class,” can slip through the cracks.

“The state resources don’t always account for the students who are exceptions to the rule. We have a lot of middle-class students, whose parents have done well by working hard, so [their student’s] finances may not qualify for state support, but they’re still first-generation students coming to college that don’t necessarily have what they need,” said Amanda Dymacek, associate director of development for the Eberly College.

West Virginia continues to produce more first-generation college students than its surrounding states. “I think West Virginia is in an interesting situation, where we have so many first-generation success stories,” she said.

Scholarships provided by private funding, she added, allow students to pursue their college education with the bonus of filling them with a warranted sense of accomplishment. “For them to come here and be able to get an academic merit scholarship, or a financial need scholarship, is something that gives them a pat on the back for coming and helps them along. It’s a major confidence boost for them,” Dymacek said.

For Stephen Stanczak, the opportunity to be part of the foundation for a student’s future was too tempting to pass up. He and his wife, Valerie, created the Stanczak-Lamb Family Scholarship to honor the memory of his grandparents. “I got a great education at WVU. [It got me] into a great law school and I was as prepared, if not more prepared than most of the people in my classes,” Stanczak said. “I am grateful for the education I received and the people I met while at WVU.” Stephen and Valerie Stanczak

Stanczak hopes his scholarship, awarded to students who are from Lewis County or who are from out of state and have at least one parent who attended WVU, will benefit students who may not have had the opportunity to receive an education otherwise.

Although Stanczak, who lives in California, is not a native West Virginian, he was very close to his grandparents growing up. His wife, Valerie, is a native of Huntington, West Virginia.

I understand people have to live, but you don’t have to give a lot to make an impact. If more people gave a little, that would make an impact. If you feel like your education was beneficial, then you have a duty to give that opportunity to another person.

—Stephen Stanczak

Aubrey and Ina Lamb’s home in Weston, West Virginia, was a second home to him, and his summer adventures in the state endeared him to it. When he and his wife decided to establish a scholarship, he said they knew just what they wanted to do. Aubrey and Ina Lamb

“Lewis County is a poor county. It needs financial help. We strongly believe education is critically important,” he said. “[It] is one of the most critically fundamental aspects of a successful economy and country. If you have the opportunity to get [an education], you should do whatever it takes to get it.”

Nearly all of the funding for the scholarships the Eberly College offers comes from alumni support. These donations vary in size.

“We treat everyone’s gift equally,” Dymacek said. “Every dollar we get today is a dollar more than we had yesterday. The power of giving is not in the dollar, it’s in the cumulative. It’s in the fact that everyone is giving together toward a common goal.”

When a lot of people join together for one cause, Stanczak said, the amount given doesn’t have to break the bank. “I understand people have to live, but you don’t have to give a lot to make an impact,” he said. “If more people gave a little, that would make an impact. “If you feel like your education was beneficial, then you have a duty to give that opportunity to another person.”

While West Virginia resources provide financial assistance for students who can’t afford to attend college, a number of students, including those who would be categorized as “middle-class,” can slip through the cracks.

“The state resources don’t always account for the students who are exceptions to the rule. We have a lot of middle-class students, whose parents have done well by working hard, so [their student’s] finances may not qualify for state support, but they’re still first-generation students coming to college that don’t necessarily have what they need,” said Amanda Dymacek, associate director of development for the Eberly College.

West Virginia continues to produce more first-generation college students than its surrounding states. “I think West Virginia is in an interesting situation, where we have so many first-generation success stories,” she said.

Scholarships provided by private funding, she added, allow students to pursue their college education with the bonus of filling them with a warranted sense of accomplishment. “For them to come here and be able to get an academic merit scholarship, or a financial need scholarship, is something that gives them a pat on the back for coming and helps them along. It’s a major confidence boost for them,” Dymacek said.

For Stephen Stanczak, the opportunity to be part of the foundation for a student’s future was too tempting to pass up. He and his wife, Valerie, created the Stanczak-Lamb Family Scholarship to honor the memory of his grandparents. “I got a great education at WVU. [It got me] into a great law school and I was as prepared, if not more prepared than most of the people in my classes,” Stanczak said. “I am grateful for the education I received and the people I met while at WVU.”

Stanczak hopes his scholarship, awarded to students who are from Lewis County or who are from out of state and have at least one parent who attended WVU, will benefit students who may not have had the opportunity to receive an education otherwise.

Although Stanczak, who lives in California, is not a native West Virginian, he was very close to his grandparents growing up. His wife, Valerie, is a native of Huntington, West Virginia.

I understand people have to live, but you don’t have to give a lot to make an impact. If more people gave a little, that would make an impact. If you feel like your education was beneficial, then you have a duty to give that opportunity to another person.

—Stephen Stanczak

Aubrey and Ina Lamb’s home in Weston, West Virginia, was a second home to him, and his summer adventures in the state endeared him to it. When he and his wife decided to establish a scholarship, he said they knew just what they wanted to do.

“Lewis County is a poor county. It needs financial help. We strongly believe education is critically important,” he said. “[It] is one of the most critically fundamental aspects of a successful economy and country. If you have the opportunity to get [an education], you should do whatever it takes to get it.”

Nearly all of the funding for the scholarships the Eberly College offers comes from alumni support. These donations vary in size.

“We treat everyone’s gift equally,” Dymacek said. “Every dollar we get today is a dollar more than we had yesterday. The power of giving is not in the dollar, it’s in the cumulative. It’s in the fact that everyone is giving together toward a common goal.”

When a lot of people join together for one cause, Stanczak said, the amount given doesn’t have to break the bank. “I understand people have to live, but you don’t have to give a lot to make an impact,” he said. “If more people gave a little, that would make an impact. “If you feel like your education was beneficial, then you have a duty to give that opportunity to another person.”